Book Review: Medic! By Ben Sherman

Since my teens I’ve been fascinated by the Vietnam War and have read several books about it. This one, a memoir of one man’s war is unique in that it deals with a man who was drafted but refused to carry a weapon.

Sherman requested to be listed as a conscientious objector, as his personal beliefs meant that while he was happy to serve his country he wasn’t willing to kill for it. His objections are overruled and he is sent to basic training, where he refuses to pick up a rifle. After a brief spell as a military prisoner he is transferred to become a medic and ships out to the war.


I admire Sherman for his courage in sticking with his beliefs and also for the honesty in his writing. He describes simply but effectively the horrors he witnesses and his emotions throughout. He repeatedly opens up about his fears and doubts.

His war is slightly shorter than the average tour but not without incident. Originally placed at the morgue he then moves on to his posting where he medics rotate through three jobs- surgery aboard a ship, combat medic on the ground with the troops and then on helicopters for medevac missions.

During one mission and under fire, he falls from the chopper and is listed KIA. Dazed, wounded and alone, Sherman is haunted by ghosts of dead friends and drifts in anspd out of consciousness, terrified of what might be hiding in the jungle. It turns out he isn’t alone, his only companion being a deranged officer. Nicknamed Captain Buttshot because he has been shot three times by his own men, he makes poor company and Sherman worries for his safety.

Luckily a fellow medic comes out to rescue him, and he returns to base where he discovers that his colleague Smitty has been looking out for him for longer than he thought and hides him from the front until he recovers.

It’s a short book but well written and engaging, with Sherman being a no frills writer who delves into his memories of his time in Vietnam. As a medic he saw the horrors of war up close and experienced the tension of waiting for attack and the terror of combat. 

It’s refreshingly low key and as a conscientious objector he isn’t going hi but admits to not having been one of the protestors. In a way he highlights the middle ground, the disinterested youth who were sucked into this war. And his return to the world means he discovers what has been going on and how divisive the war is.

Sherman provides a unique and atypical war story, and it’s admirable that he doesn’t try to avoid service but stays true to his belief. His war shows the odd mix of bureaucracy and chaos that was his life in the army. The impression is one of young men thrown into a mad, confused conflict with only ten days of medic training to help him deal with the carnage he would be faced with.

Verdict: An interesting and well done memoir of one man’s war and principles. 7/10.

Any thoughts? You know what to do. BETEO.

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2 Comments on “Book Review: Medic! By Ben Sherman”

  1. Rachel says:

    This definitely sounds interesting.


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