Book Review: Deception Point by Dan Brown

I’ve only read one Dan Brown novel before, The Da Vinci Code, and quite enjoyed it. Sure it was largely forgettable but there’s no denying that Brown knows how to craft an incredibly effective page turner and for me this book falls into the same territory- not a great book but a gripping read while it’s in your hand.

The story follows Rachel Sexton, who works for the National Reconnaissance Organisation (NRO) who run a network of spy and observation posts. Her working for the government is a problem for her father, Senator Sedgwick Sexton who is in the running to be the next President due to his stance of attacking government overspending. One of the rods he beats President Herney is NASA’s budget and failures.
Herney calls Rachel in and asks her to help with something very hush hush. He needs her to authenticate something as her job ensures she knows how to spot faulty or doctored evidence. She winds up in the Arctic where NASA have found a meteorite containing fossils of bugs. Big news.

Unfortunately some of the evidence is shaky and when Rachel investigates with some of the independent scientists called in to verify NASA’s findings they are attacked. 

Meanwhile her father’s campaign aide and one-time mistress, Gabrielle Ashe, is alerted that Sexton’s anti-NASA stance may be financially motivated and begins digging.

Is the meteorite genuine? If not, who has faked it and why? Who calls the shots for the elite soldiers after Rachel and the scientists? And how dodgy is Senator Sexton?

The plot whips along quite nicely and Brown does a good job in making the tension build up throughout. There are enough thrills to keep you going and by using quick, short chapters Brown keeps it moving so you find yourself racing along and ignoring some of the book’s flaws.

And there are quite a few. There’s a lot of scientific blather delivered through heavy handed dialogue and the characters are underdeveloped. Even the lead Rachel is a shallow, hastily created figure. Aside from a fear of water, a dead mother and a grudge against her dad she has nothing to her and the romance that develops with another character doesn’t feel right. It springs up so quickly and under such pressure that the bloke’s feeling that he can finally move on from his dead wife feels stupidly premature.

Incidentally a memory of his conversation with his wife is so cheesy and TV movie like it actually made me laugh aloud.

It won’t change your life and I doubt it will stick with me but it’s a gripping yarn and passes the time well enough. I blazed through it rather quickly and despite some dialogue that makes you roll your eyes it’s an engaging and gripping thriller. I was hooked in early and involved in the adventure, and am grateful I had it to help pass the time on an extremely boring shift.

Verdict: Brown isn’t the best writer but he does know how to create tension and keep the reader hooked. The pacing is done well and the central conspiracy involving enough that you forgive some of the failings and go along for the ride. 7/10.

Any thoughts? You know what to do. BETEO.

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