Film Review: Inside Out

This might have been the year I turned 30, but so far my top movies of the year list is topped by cartoons. This movie joins Big Hero 6 as one of the best cinematic experiences I’ve had this year.

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As with most Pixar movies this is based on a simple, but clever premise, taking us inside the head of a young girl, Riley (Kaitlyn Dias), and showing us the emotions who run the show in there.
First and foremost is Joy (Amy Poehler), who’s usually in charge of keeping the others in line and Riley happy.

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Joy at work

The others are Sadness (Phyllis Smith), Fear (Bill Hader), Disgust (Mindy Kaling) and Anger (Lewis Black). Joy accepts they all have a place, apart from Sadness, who she can’t quite work out.
So far Riley’s life has been happy and simple, and the happy core memories she’s formed have helped form the islands of personality that make her who she is.
But when Riley’s dad gets a new job and they have to move to San Francisco things start to get harder and Joy reacts badly to the fact Sadness causes Riley’s first sad core memory. Joy, Sadness and the core memories wind up thrown out of HQ and lost in the memory banks. Realising that if they don’t get back Riley will never be happy and that her personality can’t stay the same without her memories to inform them they set out across Riley’s mind to get back to HQ.
Can they survive and make it back? How will Fear, Anger and Disgust manage? And what will happen to Riley?
This movie is just flat out great, and should be really cool in helping kids (and adults) understand emotion better. It shows how each emotion can effect us and why they are there.
It’s also, like most Pixar movies, chock full of invention. The design of Riley’s mindscape is glorious, with HQ and the memory banks clearly designed on different parts of the brain. It also reflects how our minds work in clever visual ways, like a Train of thought that meanders and changes route frequently or the fact the memory workers who clear the forgotten ones and delight in randomly sending up an advertising jingle to HQ.
But there’s real substance here amidst the crazy visuals and a consistent stream of laugh-out-loud jokes. For one Riley is an engaging character and believable, with the writers capturing genuine emotions and relatable situations. From embarrassment over well meaning parents to the desire to be cool, there’s lots here that most of us will have experienced.

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Embarrassing parents, familiar for many of us

The emotions, despite having one major characteristic are well done and involving, especially Joy who over the course of the film gains new perspective and understanding. The movie shows us that each emotion serves a purpose and that Sadness isn’t always a bad thing.
What I especially liked were glimpses into different characters heads and their emotions, particularly a boy who meets Riley and who’s emotions we’re shown being thrown into utter panic as a “Girl” alarm sounds. It felt painfully real remembering my own experiences in my early teens.
And it wouldn’t be Pixar without an emotional body blow and a sequence about Riley’s almost forgotten imaginary friend, Bing Bong (Richard Kind), had me a little bit teary.

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Bing Bong, Sadness and Joy

All in all this movie is an utter delight, funny, moving and clever, it manages to both show how we grow as people and a simplified way of how our minds work with real wit and an engaging, captivating story. It easily ranks among the best of Pixar’s movies which is saying a lot.
Verdict: Pixar knock it out of the park with a movie that bursts at the seams with clever touches, invention and warmth. Over the course of the movie it had me laughing loudly, almost in tears and thinking about pretty big concepts. A gem of a movie and I already want to watch it again. 9/10.
Any thoughts? You know what to do. BETEO.

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One Comment on “Film Review: Inside Out”

  1. […] week I saw Inside Out and loved it, and before the film there was a short film. Being a short movie, this will be a short […]


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